I'm not cool, i'm not hip.. i suck more than the zombie version of your mother

People can find the good in just about anything but themselves. Look at me. It’s clear to all of you that I am awesome. But I could never admit that. That would make me an ass. But what I can do is see what makes Annie awesome. She’s driven. We need driven people or the lights go out and the ice cream melts. And Pierce, we need guys like Pierce. This guy has wisdom to offer. We should listen to him some time. We wouldn’t regret it. And Shirley, Shirley has earned our respect. Not as a wife, not as a mother, but as a woman. Don’t test her on that, because that thing about the jukebox was too specific to be improvised. And Troy. Who cares if Troy thinks he’s all that? Maybe he is. You think astronauts go to the moon because they hate oxygen? No, they’re trying to impress their high school’s prom king. And Abed. Abed’s a shaman. You ask him to pass the salt, he gives you a bowl of soup. Because you know what, soup is better. Abed is better. You are all better than you think you are. You are designed not to believe it when you hear it from yourself. I want you to look to the person to your left. Sorry. Look at the person sitting next to you. I want you to extend to that person the same compassion you extend to sharks, pencils and Ben Affleck. I want you to say to that person, “I forgive you.” You’ve just stopped being a study group. You have become something unstoppable. I hear by pronounce you a Community.

(Source: ameliasfairytales, via greendalebeing)

americansfan:

"Elizabeth beating the shit out of Claudia actually brought us to our feet in the editing room, chanting, “KGB! KGB! KGB!”… but the real moment that resonates from that sequence is the scene after, where Philip and Elizabeth walk out of the safe house and confront the cracks in their relationship, and the meaning of trust, love and betrayal." - Executive producer Joel Fields about his favorite scene in season 1. Read the Writer’s Guild of America’s interview with Joel Fields and Joe Weisberg here.

(Source: fanlingo)


The eighties spy drama “The Americans” is sexier than many pay-cable shows, in part because it’s about life as role-play
Illustration by Studio Nippoldt for The New Yorker (31 March, 2014)

The eighties spy drama “The Americans” is sexier than many pay-cable shows, in part because it’s about life as role-play

Illustration by Studio Nippoldt for The New Yorker (31 March, 2014)

(Source: giliananderson)

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